Christianity is literally true

Christianity is literally true. By that, the story of Christ in the New Testament is a story that actually happened. If a story has happened before, then it is true. Because the story of Christ happened, it is necessarily true.

Many people confuse the story of Christ with historical events. Not all the events in the New Testament necessarily happened in Jerusalem in the year zero. That doesn’t mean the story isn’t true. Every story in the New Testament is a story that happened, and continues to happen.

The story of Jesus is an archetypal story. That means that it is a typical story – one that happens frequently. Archetypal stories are told as lessons or warnings. They have happened before and are sure to happen again. If your story can end as a tragedy or a comedy, its best to align yourself with the right version. We can learn from archetypal stories because they are symbolic of what is possible, and they are easy to relate to, since we experience similar trials.

Jesus’ story is an archetypal example of the hero’s journey. The hero’s journey is the cycle of myth that Joseph Campbell documented. A man takes a risk by stepping into the unknown. He learns to make sense of the unknown, he conquers the fearful while undergoing a transformation of his spirit (becomes wiser), and returns from the unknown stronger and more prepared for the world.

Jesus ventured away from home at a young age. After his baptism, he goes into the desert and fasts for 40 days. He rejects pleasure and temptation during this fast. He then returns to the world to share his knowledge and recommend virtue to others. His teachings were rejected by many people. They didn’t just reject his teachings, they chose to silence him from preaching to those that wanted to listen. He continued to fight for what he most believed in – the spread of virtue. In the end, he was put to death in the most humiliating, extreme way possible. When he rose from the dead, he returned to the world to continue preaching virtue.

Jesus lived this journey that we all experience. We all are called to adventure at different points in our lives. We choose to accept to go into the unknown at some points, and those are the ones that change us. This could be going away to college to develop skills and gain knowledge. This could be a promotion to a new job position where we are initially unfamiliar with the requirements for success. This could be tackling an addiction.

This adventure can destroy us mentally and physically, or we can conquer that which is unknown. We can get fired from the job, fail our classes, and start drinking again. Or, we can excel in the new job and realign ourselves for the next promotion. Either way, we are changed in the process. We acquire new knowledge or skills which allow us to return to the known world better prepared for anything that can happen.

New skills or knowledge is required to return to civilization. Without it, the adventurer is unable to make sense of the unknown, and he is unable to return. If he is unable to return, the unknown either breaks him down until he is left with nothing, or he continues to try to learn and make sense of it. Like Jesus when he rises from the dead – we rise out of the struggle of an addiction or a new job where we are incompetent to a level of mastery over the known world. Our mastery could be over the known world of addiction, the new job, or virtue as a means to eternal joy.

Jesus’ story is both archetypal and significant to all of us, and it is also an extreme example. His story gives an extreme example of every major event that we all experience on our own hero’s journey. He chose the most extreme adventure – one that would seek eternal joy but kill him in the process. Likewise, we choose our adventure, and we face the same obstacles – temptation and fears, that Jesus faced.

In summary, Christianity is literally true. It is true because it happened. The story of Jesus not only happened once, but it happens all the time. It is the story we all go through as we venture into the unknown then acquire knowledge and wisdom to return stronger and more prepared for any events.

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